Review: Turtles All The Way Down by John Green

john_green_turtles_all_the_way_down_book_cover

It’s been a while since I last reviewed a book, and that’s almost entirely down to a reading slump that I fell into. A few weeks ago however, I found myself in that all too familiar state of finding a book being released soon, deciding I have to have it, then pre-ordering it immediately. It just so happens this time, the book on the other end of the webpage was Turtles All The Way Down by John Green. I can’t have been the only one to recognise the origin of the title, and wondering in what, almost entirely abstract way Green would manage to weave such an idea into the book; a book about a girl suffering with OCD reuniting with an old friend who happens to be the son of a millionaire on the run who has left his entire estate to a tuatara alongside her friend who together try and find the missing millionaire. How were you going to weave in a concept about Earth and it lying on the tops of many turtles all stacked on top of one another?

I can’t judge for that unfortunately. Trust me – read it and the reference is appropriately in there, so do go and find it for yourselves. What I do know is that this book felt somewhat different from John Green’s previous novels. Those who know me as a reader specifically well enough will know that The Fault In Our Stars was the first YA novel I ever read, and it’s like a gateway to the rest of the genre. I loved it. Make no mistake – Turtles is distinctly John Green, with philosophical insights littered from the get-go that make you suddenly question your very existence (I remember an insight from Aza where she reminds herself that there are bacteria within her gut that digest her food for her and can tell her brain what to do, so whether or not she actually is digesting her food and whether her thoughts are her own – it’s stuck with me several days after finishing the book!) and characters who are linked in some way who happen to fall into a romance. It makes it sound like I’m calling the book a cliché, which in a way I suppose I am, but the best kind of cliché.

I do know from watching John’s videos online that he’s been able to tie in personal experiences of his own into the writing of this book, which I think makes the book more insightful. Experiences vary vastly when it comes to things like mental illnesses, which for me personally made the book more interesting.

I appreciated the use of the romance between Aza and Davis as being a focal point of the story, though not the only one and certainly not the main focal point of the story – it’s not the only time you see a story arc emerge within the novel. There are several parallel stories which, although sounds odd, works perfectly, though I won’t say more through fear of spoiling the book for those who haven’t read it.

It’s been a while since John Green wrote his last book, but I’m very happy he’s back. I enjoyed Turtles All The Way Down – as you may have guessed from what I’ve written above, it’s not my favourite John Green novel, but it’s still a worthy read in any and every case.

 

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2 thoughts on “Review: Turtles All The Way Down by John Green

    • Definitely The Fault In Our Stars – like I said in the review, it’s the first YA novel I ever read and I was blown away by it when I read it for the first time. I’ve reread it several times as well. What’s your favourite, if you have one! Thanks for the comment too!

      Liked by 1 person

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